Thursday, September 5, 2013

Modified Timeline of Humans






Finally!  A picture of my (mostly) completed replacement for the Timeline of Humans!  I say "mostly" because I plan to get this laminated.  However, the most economical laminating in my area is at the local teacher's supply store and this is NOT the time of year to have something laminated there.  I want to wait another week until all the school teachers have had at least a week at school and the rush for laminating has died down a bit.  I could also laminate it with a roll of clear contact paper.  I'm just afraid I will mess it up and make it all wrinkly because it is so long.

I still have to make my mute chart.  The mute chart will only have the ink lines that I've drawn and the dates.  I have already made, cut, and laminated duplicates of all the labels and picture cards which will remain loose for the boys to place on the mute chart.

Yesterday I wrote about the changes I have made to the Third Great Lesson story.  To sum it up again here, my story will begin by reflecting on the First and Second Great Lessons with the purpose of reflecting on how God very specifically prepared the Earth to support human life.  We will read from Genesis 1 and arrive at the creation of Man.  Then, I will talk about the ways in which humans are special and different from all previous creation.  Finally, I will give an overview of the seven events that have shaped human history, the Seven C's of History.

The Timeline of Humans is one of the the traditional follow-up works to the Third Great Lesson.  Obviously I wanted a timeline that reflected the story I planned to tell but also one that would steer my boys toward the traditional topics that arise in the original timeline such as the Fundamental Needs of Man, the development of skills, migration, etc.,

I wasn't sure what my new timeline would look like until I stumbled across Winston Broad's "Biblical Worldview Project" over at Creation Ministries International.  The article gives step-by-step for making the same timeline I have made here.  Also, the author shows you how this timeline is something the CHILD can actually make with an adult partner!  I highly recommend you follow that link and read about Mr. Broad's experiences.

It is always great if the child can make their own timelines.  There are some pros and cons to that in my particular situation with this particular timeline.  Winston Broad makes his with older children (9-10 year olds) and my kids don't really have the coordination to pull off the lines and dates on something of this size.  Also, I wanted them to be able to build the timeline over and over again.  For those reasons, I chose to make the control timeline on my own and also make the mute timeline.

click on image to enlarge

My timeline is about 2 meters long.   I made it on easel paper.  I wanted my timeline to be a little taller than the one at Creation Ministries so I layered two lengths of the easel paper.  This allowed me to use large image cards for the 7 C's of History labels instead of simply writing the words on the timeline.

click on image to enlarge

There are a lot of places to get images for a timeline like this one.  I chose the same source that Mr. Broad used.  I bought two copies of the large-sized Timeline of World History poster from Creation Ministries ($5 each).  I also purchased (optional) a Seven C's Timeline Poster from Answers in Genesis.  I wanted the poster for my own reference (to see what events were listed) and for later classroom use.  I cut 7 C's images from the top of the poster, scanned them to make extras for the mute timeline, and added them to the bottom of my own timeline.

There are other potential places to get images to make your own timeline.

Confessions of a Homeschooler sells a downloadable set of images that cover Creation to Resurrection for $5.
Sonlight sells several sets of peel-and-stick (!) timeline stickers that would probably be awesome and easy to use. Prices vary according to the set.
Homeschool in the Woods sells pre-printed sets of timeline figures from Creation to Christ for $22.95.

I chose to go with the "known" rather than the unknown and chose to cut apart the World History Posters.  I also eliminated some of their choices and made about 10 images on my own to add to the chart.  Both the Answers in Genesis chart and the Creation Ministries chart include both Biblical and secular events.  Obviously there are only a few events represented on the timeline.  The purpose is to provide a framework of Biblical and secular events across the skeleton of the 7 C's of History.  There are just enough events to create pegs to hang other events in the future.  There are just enough so that when the boys work with more complex timelines they will find some reassuringly familiar guideposts.


click on image to enlarge

This brings me to another point.  If you don't want to make your own timeline and are willing to make some compromises on level-of-detail and/or ease-of-use you have some options.  One option would be to use the Timeline of World History Poster from Creation Ministries as is, without cutting it up.  The events follow a circuitous route on that poster with make it more difficult to use. One could also use the 7 C's of History Timeline poster from Answers in Genesis.  The problem with that timeline is that it is not very visual.  Many events are crammed into a relatively short physical length of paper and there are no images.

I think my favorite choice would be the Big Book of History timeline.  You can read a blog post by a family who uses it at Joyful Mothering.  That timeline is beautifully made and a visual delight.  It does, however, have A LOT more information on it than what I included on mine.  I felt like it was too much information for a first timeline.  We own it and I plan to bring it out as a follow-up to my own timeline in future years.  I also have a teacher's guide that goes with it.

Even one more step up in complexity from the Big Book of History would be Adam's Chart of History.  There is so much information there, however it is very DENSE.  You can read a blog post written by a family who uses it at Six Golden Coins.  The Adam's Chart also has a teacher's guide that is available. 

If any of you have made your own timeline to follow the Third Great Lesson be sure to link it in the elementary history section of the Homemade Materials Collaboration (left-hand sidebar).  If you have any new ideas for timeline figures or have used any of the options listed we'd love to hear about it in the comments.





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15 comments:

  1. Your timeline looks great! I love seeing how there are so many options with the Great Lessons so they will fit everyone's beliefs.
    How easy was it to work with the easel paper in this length? I have been thinking about making my own timeline of life for the 2nd great lesson but I worry about using easel paper for it.
    http://expeditionmontessori.blogspot.com

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  2. The easel paper was no problem. I own the traditional laminated timelines from Alisons' and I think once mine is laminated with real film (as opposed to contact paper) the feel of the two timelines will be the same. I wouldn't try to use it for six years without laminating it. The contact paper won't feel as professional but would do the job and make the timeline easy to roll. The easel paper didn't pose any problems while I was making the work. It was just a little longer than my kitchen table with the leaf in. I was glad I didn't have to work on the floor.

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  3. :OH: :MY: - I love it! We have a printing factory close to town that gives away their 'remnants' of rolls, which is actually A LOT of paper, so I definitely have the paper to recreate this. I love that it's not just nice, but do-able for anyone - I had wondered where you got the pictures for your timeline, and I am so excited to see that it's easy (and inexpensive) to get them! :) Like I said, you may or may not see something vaguely similar creep up in my children's school work before too terribly long... I feel like I am really behind on some of these things, because LM is already 9 (!), but nonetheless, later is better than never!

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    1. Imitation is the highest form of flattery or something like that. GO FOR IT :)

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    1. Thanks Lisa! I don't know about amazing, but I have my moments :)

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  5. and what a moment!!!LOL ITS BEAUTIFUL!!!! LOVE IT LOVE IT!! You are an artist!!!!! Amazing work!!! Congrats my friend!!

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    1. Oh thank you Karen! I really appreciate the support!

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  6. Thank you for sharing your hard work! I appericate the time you take to post all of the links, and make your pictures large. I use so much of your work in my own school, and have to confess if it wasn't for you my kids probably wouldn't have quite so much fun! :) I love this time line! My boys are in the 9 - 12 age so I am going to have them do one on their own. Thank you!

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  7. Sarah,

    This comment really made my week. I was just writing the post on Fundamental Needs and resizing photos and I thought back to your comment. You really helped make the work a pleasure today. You will have SOO much fun making your own timeline with the kids. The part where you write in the 10 names and show how the Bible uses their record to show how time is recorded is just so valuable.

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  8. We have been using Homeschool in the Woods timeline for several years but this year after reading more on the Answers in Genesis site, I am not happy with the dates given. I really think I am going to make the jump to assemble something like this. The boys will get a kick out of it! Thank you so much for sharing and all the useful links!

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  9. I am confused. I always thought that "0" on the timeline was when Jesus was born. I see here in the Big Book that it is 5 B.C. Did I have this wrong all along or did some new understanding come out somewhere along the way? I am just wondering why it changed to A.D. if it didn't correlate with any particular event. (Hoping you know the answer to this) I am working on making my own timeline and was wondering about this. Thank you! Happy house hacking. You are one crazy motivated woman. :)

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    1. Gigi - when the Christian calendar was set we had two problems:
      1- we didn't have the exact year of Christ's birth. When this was later analyzed more carefully based on historical records, the date was modified; but the calendar stayed because it was already central to life.
      2- we had these issues with not calculating to the microsecond the actual length of a day, and therefore a year. There was a point in history where we lost quite a few days because of this discrepancy (the calendar was adjusted to "fix it") ---- now we have leap years to compensate: every year divisible by 4 we have a leap, unless it is a 100-year (1800, 1900, etc.), in which case we skip the leap year day-addition because we've already overcompensated; BUT every 1000 year (2000 for example) we KEEP the leap year because we've undercompensated. Our days are not precisely 24 hours long is the problem.

      So the adjustments due to #2 also contributed to why the calendar didn't get fully fixed when the birth of Christ was more accurately calculated.

      People get up in arms over daylight savings, can you imagine changing the entire year? ;)

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  10. Thank you Jessica! I am so glad I wasn't totally off. BTW I am Angie in KoTU :)

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