Friday, February 19, 2016

Decimal Fractions


We started a new thread of work this week, decimal fractions.  We got through the first several presentations and then paused because I realized I needed the number cards from the bank game and I sold it.  I needed some things from Alison's anyway and they are super quick.  The new bank game will be here on Monday and then we can continue.  You also need some hierarchically-colored beads (not bead bars) for these demonstrations.  If you happen to have the box of beads that go with a small square root board like we did that would be perfect, otherwise you can cannibalize your racks and tubes.


We used the fraction circles to demonstrate that the unit divided into ten equal pieces creates "tenths" and introduced the hierarchically-colored wooden cubes.


I was super frustrated that my decimal cubes, from Kid Advance, are not really the right colors.  One album I have describes the six colors of cubes as "light blue, lighter blue, pink, light pink, light green and lighter green."  I would have settled for "blue, red, green, light blue, pink, and light green."  Instead I have two dark blues so close in color only a Montessori primary child fresh off color box three could distinguish them.  The greens aren't much better.  As this is the third time in the past few weeks I've discovered that materials specifically from Kid Advance, while undamaged and passed my initial inspection, are not always made to Montessori specifications and not necessarily usable. Edited to add:  I had a great customer service experience with Kid Advance today, and they didn't know I was a blogger.  Everything has been rectified.   I think I will break out the spray paint this weekend and lighten up one set of blue and one set of green cubes.



Eventually we reached the point where the boys could talk me through this progressing either to the left or to the right of the unit bead in the center something like as follows:  a unit divided into ten equal pieces becomes tenths, one tenth divided into ten pieces becomes hundredths, one hundredth divided into ten pieces becomes thousandths, etc.,  OR a unit multiplied by ten creates a ten, a ten multiplied by ten becomes one hundred, one hundred multiplied by ten becomes one thousand.  Next week when I have everything available I can introduce the number symbols.

5 comments:

  1. So sorry reading your frustation with the material...I love this presetnation! Im preparing my self for the presentation with the princess very soon!!

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    1. Well, I've got it all re-painted now and am feeling better about it. Did not enjoy turning 200 little cubes several times to get them painted evenly.

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  3. So cool to read about you guys doing this. :) Was thinking of you today as we were toiling away in the classroom doing regular fractions though. What are you planning to use as your crown? I think we initially used a tiny paper one T made, and then I purchased one from a craft store that was supposed to be a necklace, or bracelet charm.
    Can't wait to read more.

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    1. How funny :) Our crown is from a charm at the craft store too. The only one I could find was on the head of a bead princess ballerina. Fortunately the head was a bead and the crown was above it. They were all connected with a wire. Felt a little bad cutting the wire at her neck to get it all apart. Not the first princess to get her head chopped off in the name of a crown, LOL. Cultivating Dharma made his out of tin foil.

      We are working on regular fractions too, operations with unlike denominators...

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